Fall Program Requirements

Unlike many honors programs, Millikin University doesn't reward hard-work and academic success simply with more work. Instead Millikin Honors Students are afforded freedom and flexibility as they complete their University Studies requirements. Millikin Honors courses are engaging and enriched, student-driven courses made possible by the passion and intellectual curiosity of both the honors faculty and students. Honors students also engage significantly with both the honors community and the campus and larger community through service and outreach activities. Below are Honors pathways for both incoming freshman and transfer students. For questions, contact the Honors Director, Dr. Michael Hartsock.

Click on the link below for Fall 2021 Honors course descriptions.

Honors Students follow the Honors curriculum presented here rather than the University Studies Program Requirements presented elsewhere in the bulletin. Honors Students are still responsible for all other applicable requirements as defined by their academic programs of study (e.g., college and major specific requirements). Non-honors students must complete 37 -- 41 credit hours for University Studies, and the 29 credit hours described below replace those 37 -- 41 hours. The Millikin Honors Program is "instead of" not in addition to." Honors students take ownership of their general education experience and select from a variety of topic-oriented courses.

Honors Students must complete the following courses (29 credits)

  • HN183. Honors University Seminar (3 credits)
  • ​HN150. Honors Writing Studio I (3 credits)
  • ​HN151. Honors Writing Studio II (3 credits)
  • Three of the following (9 credits total):
    • HN202. Creative Arts Honors Seminar (3 credits)
    • HN203. Humanities Honors Seminar (3 credits)
    • HN204. Natural Science Honors Seminar (3 credits)
    • HN206. Social Science Honors Seminar (3 credits)
    • HN207. Mathematics Honors Seminar (3 credits)
  • HN300. Honors Interdisciplinary Colloquium (3 credits)
    Students may meet this requirement by taking an additional HN350 course.
  • HN350. Honors Global Interdisciplinary Colloquium (3 credits)
    Students studying abroad for Millikin credit may articulate an IN350 eligible course with either HN300 or HN350 (but not both) to fulfill this requirement.
  • IN490. Honors Independent Study (4 credits) May be articulated with a course or set of courses in another academic department (e.g., research hours in the natural sciences or an internship) via an Honors Program Capstone Contract.
  • HN400. Honors Symposium (1 credit)
  • HN300. Honors Interdisciplinary Colloquium (3 credits)

Honors Capstone Project

The Honors Capstone Project provides Honors Students with an opportunity to pursue artistic achievement, traditional or interdisciplinary research, or service-learning and community-based projects. The Honors Capstone could be an enrichment or extension of an academic project, creative activity, or practical experience in which the student is already engaged through her major area of study. It could also be a fully distinct project of the student’s choosing. To qualify as an Honors Capstone Project, a project must be judged to be of Honors-level work by the Honors Director and the Student’s Honors Project Advisor.

Transfer students who participated in the honors program at their most recent former institution of higher education are invited to petition the Honors Director for admission into Millikin University’s Honors Program. Students transferring from two-year institutions with which Millikin has a formal Honors Program articulation agreement are automatically invited to join the Honors Program. Honors coursework will be transferred as determined by the Honors Director and the University Registrar. Students who have earned an Associates of Arts or an Associate of Sciences and successfully completed their 2 year institution’s honors program will be regarded as having met all 100 and 200 level honors program requirements.

Why should a student transfer into the Millikin Honors Program?

As a transfer student, joining the Honors Program gives you the opportunity to continue your honors experience at Millikin. Our Honors Community is strong, supportive and vibrant. Transferring into the Honors Program, allows you to plug yourself directly into a community of intellectually curious and academically engaged students, students like you. The Honors Program also affords you an opportunity to complete remaining general education courses and meet a variety of other graduation requirements in an Honors environment. Transfer Honors students share all of the benefits enjoyed by all Millikin Honors Students.

Exclusive and engaging Honors Courses that:

  • Are flexible and student driven
  • Cover a wide variety of topics taught by Honors Faculty
  • Feature innovative and experimental pedagogy
  • Fulfill all University Studies requirements
  • Opportunities for individualized & self-motivated scholarship or creative projects.
  • Interaction with campus leaders among students, faculty, and administrators
  • Service and outreach activities which enrich and serve the Honors, Millikin, and larger community.
  • Access to a dedicated Honors Student Lounge.
  • Freshman and Sophomore residential Honors Communities
  • Early Registration for courses.
  • Ability to register for up to 21 credits per term at normal, full-time tuition rate.

Honors Program Requirements

  • HN300. Honors Interdisciplinary Colloquium (3 credits)
    Students may meet this requirement by taking an additional HN350 course.
  • HN350. Honors Global Interdisciplinary Colloquium (3 credits)
    Students studying abroad for Millikin credit may articulate an IN350 eligible course with either HN300 or HN350 (but not both) to fulfill this requirement.
  • IN490. Honors Independent Study (4 credits)  May be articulated with a course or set of courses in another academic department (e.g., research hours in the natural sciences or an internship) via an Honors Program Capstone Contract.
  • HN400. Honors Symposium (1 credit)

Honors Capstone Project: The Honors Capstone project provides Honors Students with an opportunity to pursue artistic  achievement, traditional or interdisciplinary research, or service-learning and community-based projects. The Honors Capstone could be an enrichment or extension of an academic project, creative activity, or practical experience in which the student is already engaged through her major area of study. It could also be a fully distinct project of the student’s choosing. To qualify as an Honors Capstone Project, a project must be judged to be of Honors-level work by the Honors Director and the Student’s Honors Project Advisor.

* Honors students who did not complete the honors program at their previous institution may need to complete additional Millikin Honors Program courses. See the Millikin University Bulletin and contact the Honors Director, Dr. Michael Hartsock for further information.

Fall 2021 Course Descriptions

As you plan for registration, I wanted to remind you that honors students are required to completed the following:

  • HN183, HN150 and HN151 (First Year Seminar and Honors Writing Studio I & II)
  • Three 200 level courses (numbers can be repeated, for example you can take two HN203s)
  • Two 300 level courses (one must be HN350, but both can be)
  • Honors Capstone Contract: 4 credits of HN490 and 1 credit of HN400 (You won't find HN490 in MU Online, those are set up via the capstone contract)

JMS students only need one but not both the HN350s and don't do the capstone contract credits.  Let me know if you have questions about JMS.

Also, the section numbers are all over the place because we had a lot of scheduling changes.

 

Honors Writing Studio I (HN150-01)

Dr. Anne Matthews

CRN: 10083

Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 12:00 p.m.-12:50 p.m.

 

Honors Writing Studio I (HN150-02)

Dr. Anne Matthews

CRN: 10084

Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 1 PM - 1:50 PM


Honors Writing Studio I (HN150-03)

Dr. Michael O’Conner

CRN: 10117

Tuesday, Thursday: 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

 

Honors Writing Studio I (HN150-04)                                       

Dr. Michael O’Conner

CRN: 10018

Tuesday, Thursday: 12:30 -- 1:45 p.m.


Honors Writing Studio I (HN150-05)

Dr. Tony Magagna

CRN: 10119

Tuesday, Thursday: 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Honors Writing Studio 1 (HN150-06)

CRN:  10120

Tuesday, Thursday:  2:00 p.m.-3:15 p.m.


Honors University Seminar (HN 183-01)

Dr. Michael Hartsock

CRN:  10080

Monday, Wednesday, Friday:  2:00 p.m.- 2:50 p.m.

Honors University Seminar (HN 183-02)

Dr. Robert Money

CRN: 10081

Monday, Wednesday, Friday:  12:00 p.m. -- 12:50 p.m.

Honors University Seminar (HN 183-03)

Dr. Robert Money

CRN:  10082

Monday, Wednesday, Friday:  11:00 a.m.-11:50 a.m.


Honors University Seminar (HN 183-04)

Dr. Eric Roark

CRN: 10121

Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 a.m.-- 11:50 a.m.

Honors University Seminar (HN 183-05)

Dr. Eric Roark

CRN:  10122

Tuesday, Thursday 2:00 p.m.--3:15 p.m.


 

200 Level Honors Seminars:

Global Haiku Traditions (HN202-01)

Dr. Randy Brooks

Tuesday, Thursday 2:00 p.m. 0 3:15 p.m.

CRN: 10123

Global Haiku Traditions examines the origins and spread of Japanese poetics from Japan around the world, with a special focus on the adaption of haiku into other cultures and languages.  This course explores the role of haiku as a social literary art--both the art of reading and art of writing haiku emphasize the importance of shared collaborative aesthetic experiences (shared acts of the imagination).  There is a very active global haiku community of writers, editors, scholars, and associations celebrating participation in this literary art.   A special feature of the course is that students will study leading international poets, editors and scholars of contemporary haiku.  We will study the history of haiku and related poetics in Japan, and then examine the contemporary internalization of haiku in various cultures.  Students complete both an analytical study of a contemporary haiku poet or issue in the haiku community as well as various creative projects connecting haiku to other parts.

 

Horror Screenwriting (HN202-02)

Professor Eric Hector

Monday, Wednesday & Friday 1:00 P.M.-1:50 P.M.

CRN: 10923

SCREENWRITING is the very foundation of movie and television production, and HORROR is a genre where any screenwriters get their start.  This course serves as a deep dive into this intricate and influential art form. Throughout the course, students will use industry standard programs to learn the proper vocabulary and format for screenplay writing.   Using this knowledge, students will write a 90 page Horror Screenplay based on their own original idea allowing everyone to share their journey of creation together. Students will also dissect a Horror movie of their choice and the screenplay from which the example was produced. They will present the results of their study to the class allowing everyone to apply the results of these examinations to their own individual works.

 

Frankenstein's Progeny (HN203-01)

Dr. Anne Matthews

Monday, Wednesday & Friday 10:00 -- 10:50 A.M.

CRN:  10254

This course is grounded in a central premise:   people are beings for whom being is a problem.  In other words, in our restless curiosity to know ourselves, we might begin by saying nothing is settled; nothing should be taken for granted; everything is open to question.  Whether we concern ourselves with personal identity, family, sexuality, gender, race ethnicity, class, society, politics, or history, our evolving self-awareness asks us to reflect on who we are, what our relationship to other beings is, and where our responsibilities--to ourselves and to each other--lie.

 

Political Liberalism (HN203-02)

Dr. Robert Money

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:00 a.m.-- 9:50 a.m.

CRN: 10379

Patrick Deneen characterizes political liberalism as a political philosophy originating around 500 years ago. Political liberalism: conceived humans as rights-bearing individuals who could fashion and pursue for themselves their own version of the good life.   Opportunities for liberty were best afforded by a limited government devoted to 'securing rights,' along with a free-market economic system that gave space for individual initiative and ambition.  Political legitimacy was grounded on a shared belief in an originating "social contract' to which even newcomers could subscribe, ratified continuously by free and fair elections of responsive representatives.   Limited but effective government, rule of law, an independent judiciary, responsive public officials, and free and fair elections were some of the hallmarks of this ascendant order..." (p.1-2).

This course will use both historical and contemporary readings to engage in a critical examination of political liberalism.  The course is divided into four units.   In the first unit, we will focus on understanding some of the historical roots of liberalism as expressed in the writings of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and John Stuart Mill.    In the second unit, we will examine the influential contemporary defense of political liberalism as expressed in John Rawls' A Theory of Justice.  In the third unit, we will examine the influential criticism of liberalism presented by Michael Sandel in his work, Liberalism and the Limits of Justice."  We will examine Marxist and feminist criticisms of liberalism.  In the fourth and final unit, we will examine Patrick Deneen's contemporary critique of political liberalism in his work Why Liberalism Failed.  According to Deneen, "liberalism has failed--not because it fell short, but because it was true to itself....[while liberalism] was launched to foster greater equity, defend a pluralist tapestry of different cultures and beliefs, protect human dignity, and, of course, expand liberty, in practice [it] generates titanic inequality, enforces uniformity and homogeneity, fosters material and spiritual degradation, and undermines freedom" (p.3).  Students will write a research paper in which they seek to evaluate Deneen's claim that liberalism has failed and needs to be replaced.

 

300 Level Honors Colloquia

Sport and Social Change (HN300-02)

Dr. Joel Blanco

Tuesday, Thursday 12:30 P.M.--1:45 P.M.

CRN:  11110

Nota Bene:  This course was previously offered as a 200 level seminar, but has been retooled and adapted for HN300 requirement.  You may not take this course if you took it as HN206 previously.

While sports is an arena that often reinforces and conforms to social norms regarding issues such as race/ethnicity, social class, and gender, sports and athletes have also served agents of social change, many times challenging norms and assumptions concerning these issues.  Drawing on theories from sociology and critical theory, this class assesses the use of sports and sporting events to facilitate social change that have been part of larger movements that impacted politics and culture.   The class will focus on international sports such as the Olympics movement and the World Cup as well as events unique to American culture. Students will apply critical thinking to mediated sports events and athletes to understand their impact and gain perspectives on how sports may be utilized to enact positive social change.

 

Global Film (HN350-01)

Dr. Michael O'Conner

Tuesday & Thursday 3:30 P.M.-- 4:45 P.M.

CRN:  10124

Though HN 203 American Film is not a prerequisite for HN 350 International Film, it does naturally pick up where American Film leaves off. This course will utilize William V. Costanzo's textbook, World Cinema through Global Genres, and follow its pedagogy of teaching world cinema through genre, comparing and contrasting international films to popular American ones.  Major genre comparisons include, "the warrior hero," "the wedding film," the "horror film," and "the road movie."   There are "deep focus" sections on the films of China, India, Japan, and Latin America.   Overall, the course will be an introduction to the global traditions of film, emphasizing the universal nature of cinema while at the same time examining regional-based cultural differences.  It will include an examination of the language of film analysis along with a survey of developments in world-wide cinema.  Films will be analyzied not just culturally, but through universal lenses such as post-colonialism, feminism, and Marixm.   Many films will be non-English accompanied with English subtitles. The course will include studies of award-winning international directors liek Lee, Del Toro, and Kurosawa.  Possible films may include, The Magnificen tSeven, Seven, Samurai, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, My Big Fat Greek Wedding, Monsoon Wedding, Wedding in Galilee, Halloween, Ring, The Devil's Backbone; Thelma and Louise, the Motorcycle Diaries, and perhaps a few others.

 

Global Graphic Novels (HN350-04)

Dr. Ngozi Onuora

Monday, Wednesday & Friday 10:00 A.M. -- 10:50 A.M.

CRN:  10934

This course is an examination of graphic novels that focus on historical, cultural, or social issues from countries other than the United States. Students will use literary criticism to analyze specific graphic texts and research a global issue related to the required readings.

 

Exploring Sesame Street:  Children's Relationship with Visual Media (HN350-05)

Dr. Georgette Page

Monday, Wednesday & Friday 12:00 P.M.--12:50 P.M.

CRN: 11111

Think back to a time when you looked forward, every morning or afternoon, to watching a show on public television that took you to a place in the City on a street, where all kinds of fun things happened, where you learned a lot about a lot of different ideas, concepts, and cultures.  Would you like to know more about Sesame Street?   In this course, we will examine how one of the most successful children's educational program was created, its history, how it has changed over the years, its mission and targeted audience, its replication throughout the world, and other behind-the-scenes workings, including the three main departments (Research, Writing & Production) that contribute to the show's continued success.  Along with this close examination of Sesame Street, the course also focuses on some of the seminal as well as more current theories on young chidren's comprehension of visual media.

 

Human Nature:  Historial and Global Perspectives (HN350-06)

Dr. Michael Hartsock

Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 A.M. -- 12:15 P.M.

CRN:  11112

What is human nature?  Is there a way that humans are, and if so, what is it and from whence does it come?  In this course, we will examine diverse perspectives on human nature, ranging from theories to human nature found in the major world religions, historical and contemporary philosophical works, and new developments in science, including non-western and feminst approaoches.   More importantly, you will examine whether and in what way you find yourself reflected in these diverse and often surprising answers to the question: "What does it mean to be Human?"

Nota Bene:  This course is completely distinct from the other human nature course I teach, which focuses on contemporary scientific approaches to human nature. This version was last taught Fall 2018.

 

 

 

Below is a sample of honors courses that were previously offered at Millikin:

Previous Honors Courses

Global Haiku Traditions
Dr. Randy Brooks

This course examines the origins and spread of Japanese poetics from Japan around the world, with a special focus on the adaptation of haiku into other cultures and languages. This course explores the role of haiku as a social literary art—both the art of reading and art of writing haiku emphasize the importance of shared collaborative aesthetic experiences (shared acts of the imagination). There is a very active global haiku community of writers, editors, scholars and associations celebrating participation in this literary art. We will study the history of haiku and related poetics in Japan, and then examine the contemporary internalization of haiku in various cultures. Students complete both an analytical study of a contemporary haiku poet or issue in the haiku community as well as various creative projects connecting haiku to other arts. There are numerous web resources available for this course located at: http://performance.millikin.edu/haiku

Stress and Disease
Dr. Travis Wilcoxen

Understanding the health and physiology of humans can be greatly improved by studying nonhuman animals. Humans have retained many ancestral physiological traits, such as stress responses, that are beneficial to many other animals, but are somewhat useless, or even harmful, to us. Further, as human populations continue to grow and encroach on populations of wild animals, diseases that are often found in other animals occasionally jump into human populations. In this course, students will gain an understanding of the interrelatedness of stress and disease of humans and other animals through the reading of primary sources and nonfiction works with scientific topics. This course also includes hands-on laboratory activities.

It Came From Memphis
Dr. Dave Burdick

It Came from Memphis is an examination of the origins of Rock and Roll artistry and how this artistry was developed and commercialized through recording technology. Artistry can best be understood through a larger examination of social/historical context and the very nature of artistic creation. So, even though this is not really a history course, there is a strong component of historical study with the intent being to place artistry and recording technology – coupled with the music entrepreneurs whose vision provided the means for artists to attain commercial success in time, and thus understand sequences of events and influences that have led us to where we are today regarding Rock and Roll music. It Came from Memphis includes a field trip to Memphis over the first weekend of Fall break so that we may “walk in the footsteps of history”.

International Trade and Economic Development
Dr. Najiba Benabess

This course is composed of two parts. In the first part, we examine why nations trade, what they trade, and whether trade is beneficial for a country. We cover the comparative advantage theory, which explains international trade with the differences in labor productivity and resource endowments. International labor capital movements and foreign outsourcing will be also discussed. The second part focuses on the relationship between international trade and economic development. We discuss how international trade affects economic growth, income inequality, and poverty reduction in the trading countries. We will also study the trade policies such as tariff and nontariff instruments and their impact on welfare under different market structures. In particular, we evaluate the effectiveness of trade policies in developing countries in promoting economic development. The evolution of regional free trade agreements and the new world trading system under the WTO will be reviewed and discussed.

Horror in Film and Fiction: Daring the Nightmare
Prof. Judi Crowe

This course explores the genre of horror in fiction and film, its historical, social, political, and cultural underpinnings, and what is at stake in the genre as a whole in terms of issues of religion, psychology, science, ethics, gender, race, and culture. We will examine and discuss a variety of scholarly, historical, literary, and pop culture sources as well as view films representative of various subgenres (monster, psychological, etc.) of horror. Core texts by Stephen King and our reading packet offer diverse grounding of a topic that continues to disturb, sometimes disgust, yet ever intrigues us. Indeed, as King points out, we do so like to dare the nightmare……..

Sex, Lies, and the Brothers Grimm: The Real Fairy Tales
Dr. Anne Matthews

We know fairy tales mostly through Disney versions—Beauty and the Beast, in particular, has enjoyed multiple iterations and interpretations. But if we go back to the original stories (or as close as we can get in origination and translation), we quickly find that the once familiar tales are actually quite strange: more raw, more complex, more challenging and disturbing. Still, the old tales have much to tell us about love, sex, marriage, family, childhood, society, violence, abandonment, and perhaps most important of all, transformations from one way of being into another. In short, the storytellers had the same questions we have: who are we? What is my relationship to others? Why should I care about my community? Where am I going? These are only some opening questions—no doubt we will think of others as we read and talk and write about these weird works of the human imagination.

Psych for a Popular Audience
Dr. Melissa Scircle

Psychology for a Popular Audience will investigate the science of psychology through reading books written about psychology for a mass audience, watching TED talks, listening to podcasts, reading news articles, and - yes - reading the original research articles. We will explore what makes science writing different from scientific writing, how scientists can effectively communicate their research findings to non-scientists and discover how psychological research goes beyond the laboratory to make a broader impact on the world. Plan to read, watch, listen, discuss, write…and maybe even give your own TED talk.

Monsters, Exiles & Others
Dr. Anne Matthews

Of all the definitions of “monster”—abnormal, grotesque, repulsive, among others—I like the Latin one best. From the word “monere”—to monitor, to warn—and from the word “monstrum”—a divine omen, a portent, a sign—the monster emerges as an observer, as well as a messenger. What does the monster see? What news has she come to give us? What warning must we heed? In our reading, which will include Beowulf, Frankenstein, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, The Island of Dr Moreau, and one or two other narratives, we will attend to the monsters’ tales, taking in their knowledge and discerning what they are asking us to do.

Creating the Documentary: Telling the Story of a Lifetime
Dr. Ngozi Onuora

This 3 credit hour course allows student scholars to research and create an 8 to 10 minute documentary about a national, historical, or social issue for which they are passionate and want to bring to the consciousness of the campus and the greater (local) community. Working in teams of 35 people (depending on class size), students will take on key roles as part of a film crew while engaging in critical thinking, reading, writing, research, and creative problem-solving to plan the content of the documentary and the execution of filming/editing/producing the final movie to tell a story they have always wanted to tell. To prepare for the process of creating a quality documentary, scholars will watch and critique several documentaries throughout the first half of the semester; learn about copyright laws and fair use policies; address ethical issues in documentary storytelling; learn ways documentaries can address historical, social, cultural, and political issues; practice effective use of video recording devices; and, experiment with editing footage using video editing software such as iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere, etc. (depending on available software), among other preparatory learning activities. The culminating event will be Millikin University’s fifth Blue Docs Rock documentary film festival. Film crews will advertise and generate a publicity campaign to garner support for the premiere of their documentaries. Finally, students may be encouraged to submit their documentaries to appropriate film festivals or online venues to experience entering a film contest.