The Non-Sequential Program

The University Studies Program’s non-sequential requirements may be taken by students any time throughout their undergraduate experience at Millikin. These requirements insure a breadth of learning and ways of knowing from a variety of academic disciplines and approaches to inquiry, including (1) a quantitative reasoning course, (2) a creative arts course, (3) a natural science with a laboratory course, (4) an oral communication studies course, and (5) international cultures and structure courses. Through course advising, students can select and shape the direction of these non-sequential University Studies requirements to complement and supplement learning opportunities in their majors. Students in a major or minor that delivers a non-sequential course or a sequential course outside of the first year (e.g., IN250, IN251, or IN350) may take it to fulfill both the non-sequential or sequential requirement of University Studies and a requirement in the major or minor, depending on requirements of the major or minor.

Quantitative Reasoning Requirement

Quantitative reasoning courses teach students how to utilize qualitative and quantitative reasoning and the scientific method as tools in decision making and creative problem solving.

Natural Science with a Laboratory Requirement

In a natural science with a laboratory course, students utilize qualitative and quantitative reasoning and the scientific method as tools in decision making and creative problem solving.

Creative Arts Requirement

Creative Arts courses such as courses in literature (e.g., fiction, poetry, drama), the arts (e.g., painting, sculpture, architecture, design, music, theatre and dance, film, photography, new media), and the history/philosophy of art examine mediums that explore and express the potential of human imagination and the value of human artistic production. In courses fulfilling this requirement, students will engage with issues involved in making, interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating written texts, musical works, visual and material culture, performing arts, and other media presentations in the context of the histories and cultures that have shaped and been shaped by their production. Students enrolled in these courses will increase their ability to understand themselves and others and will enhance their capacity to enjoy their own and others’ creative processes and products.

Oral Communication Studies Requirement

Oral Communication Studies courses combine communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. Students will develop effective and appropriate oral communication skills for diverse public contexts. Oral Communication Studies course: (1) develop awareness of the communication process; (2) provide intentional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promote understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasize critical skills in listening, reading, thinking, and speaking.

International Cultures and Structures

This two-course requirement focuses on cultures and social structures outside the United States. It may be satisfied by courses in modern language, internationally focused courses from a variety of disciplines, study abroad courses, or a combination of these. Culture refers to learned systems of meanings, and their representations, that people use to interact with the world around them, including language, values, beliefs, norms, traditions, customs, history, art, and artifacts. Social structures refers to generally stable patterns of interactions, from the smallest units found in individual social relationships, through larger economic, political and social institutions in societies, to worldwide systems of relationships among nations. Each course must address culture and/or social structure. Students in a major or minor that delivers a course in International Cultures and Structures may take it to fulfill both the non-sequential requirement and a requirement in the major or minor, depending on requirements of the major or minor.